Social Media Management

In a world where everyone is competing for attention and engagement on social media, it’s my intention to ensure that when a prospective (or current) customer lands on my client’s social channels, there is a very specific impression made. This impression will look different, depending on the company it’s serving, but in all cases it would relay curated high-quality content that was put there for a reason, such as to:

a) artfully display the company’s products/services

(clearly stating what you can provide for your customer, and how it will help them)

 

b) educate the consumer about the product/service they are seeking 

(I believe an educated customer is a valuable one, because they understand the value of what they’re buying and understand the importance behind acquiring it from a high quality source)

 

c) create an emotional connection between the business and its customers, allowing the consumer to feel safe, valued, heard, etc.

(COVID is a great example. Recognize the feelings that arise in your clients when their community and health is threatened, and take the opportunity to get on the right side of empathy, compassion, and service. Give your customers a chance to feel supported by your company, even if it’s not tied directly to your product/service. Customers will return to you when they feel cared for, respected, and supported by you.)

 

d) share the company’s (carefully curated) values with the market

(make sure your customers know what you stand for as a company, and that you will stand for it consistently)

 

e) reveal a success story/happy customer/testimonial to your audience

(which is one of the most powerful ways to connect with and capture new leads or customers)

…I could go on, but I think the point is clear. This list did not include things like impromptu pictures of your social media manager’s lunch, or irrelevant (however cute) videos of the neighbor’s dog. 

People are inundated with information online. Our objective is not to overwhelm them with confusing and irrelevant massaging, just to be in front of them. The goal is QUALITY, not QUANTITY. 

Let’s take Facebook for example. The organic reach of business pages has declined consistently over the years as Facebook works to turn free marketers into paid advertisers. They want you to pay for reach, impressions, likes, follows, and engagement.

You can throw money at them all day long (and it will help to a degree, because your posts will be seen by a larger audience) but are likes and follows really your most important metric? I would argue that acquiring 1 true (paying) customer is WAY more valuable to your business than a handful of likes on a post. What’s more is that if you treat that one customer right, they will likely return to social media to market for you. (For free!) 

It’s better to post a few intentional and strategic posts per week that craftily capture your intent in an eye-catching, value-providing way, than to flood your social channels with daily posts about the weather. Something is not always better than nothing in the world of social marketing. (Or any marketing for that matter.)

Social Media Management

Here’s what it boils down to…

Allow me to insert myself as the theoretical customer. When I go looking for information about a business or their product/service, the first two places I’m going to look for it is their website and their social channels. 

While I expect the company’s website to have the most comprehensive information, I don’t always assume it will have the most current information. When I am looking for time-sensitive, up-to-date, accurate information about a business, I will almost always go to their social channels first for two reasons:

  1. Businesses and individuals update their social channels way more frequently and are way more likely to post pertinent info to their feed than they are to call their web designer for a site update. (COVID is another great example, I go to a business’s social to see if they are actually open and what capacity they are serving customers) 

    The opportunity here is to know that customers are searching out your social profile for specific information, so provide it for them. And make it easy to find. 

  2. Social channels are all laid out the same way for every business, so it’s easy to get to a Facebook page, for instance, and know exactly where to find the company’s contact info, or know exactly where the photos of their menu would be located.

    This makes social channels a valuable outlet for reaching the customers that are looking for you right now. Sometimes I get lost on a website while looking for something specific, so when I’m fairly sure that information would be on their social–I go there first because I believe I’ll find it faster since I already know the layout.  

This is all to illustrate the importance of an intentionally curated social media presence. It’s important to have so that your customers:

  • can find you…where they want to find you. Meet your customers where they’re at. Almost ALL consumers are on social. (Facebook and Instagram, specifically.)

  • can connect with you and your company’s values.

  • can communicate with you about your product/service. (For instance, auto-messaging can be set up to greet customers when they land on your Facebook page.)

  • can follow you and receive updates about your offerings when you post them.

For a small business, a quality social media presence is less about the number of likes and follows, and more about the story told throughout your posts. Craft a story that will engage your audience in a way that provides emotional value to them, while also taking the opportunity to educate them about your company’s mission and how your products/services will improve the life of your customer.

 

I can help you craft your story.

Lindsi Kay Logo 3

Reach out to me.

lindsi.kay@hotmail.com

Social Media Management

In a world where everyone is competing for attention and engagement on social media, it’s my intention to ensure that when a prospective (or current) customer lands on my client’s social channels, there is a very specific impression made.

This impression will look different, depending on the company it’s serving, but in all cases it would relay curated high-quality content that was put there for a reason, such as to:

 

a) artfully display the company’s products/services

(clearly stating what you can provide for your customer, and how it will help them)

 

b) educate the consumer about the product/service they are seeking 

(I believe an educated customer is a valuable one, because they understand the value of what they’re buying and understand the importance behind acquiring it from a high quality source)

 

c) create an emotional connection between the business and its customers, allowing the consumer to feel safe, valued, heard, etc.

(COVID is a great example. Recognize the feelings that arise in your clients when their community and health is threatened, and take the opportunity to get on the right side of empathy, compassion, and service. Give your customers a chance to feel supported by your company, even if it’s not tied directly to your product/service. Customers will return to you when they feel cared for, respected, and supported by you.)

 

d) share the company’s (carefully curated) values with the market

(make sure your customers know what you stand for as a company, and that you will stand for it consistently)

 

e) reveal a success story/happy customer/testimonial to your audience

(which is one of the most powerful ways to connect with and capture new leads or customers)

 

…I could go on, but I think the point is clear. This list did not include things like impromptu pictures of your social media manager’s lunch, or irrelevant (however cute) videos of the neighbor’s dog.

 

People are inundated with information online. Our objective is not to overwhelm them with confusing and irrelevant massaging, just to be in front of them. The goal is QUALITY, not QUANTITY. 

 

Social Media Management

 

Let’s take Facebook for example. The organic reach of business pages has declined consistently over the years as Facebook works to turn free marketers into paid advertisers. They want you to pay for reach, impressions, likes, follows, and engagement.

You can throw money at them all day long (and it will help to a degree, because your posts will be seen by a larger audience) but are likes and follows really your most important metric?

I would argue that acquiring 1 true (paying) customer is WAY more valuable to your business than a handful of likes on a post. What’s more is that if you treat that one customer right, they will likely return to social media to market for you. (For free!) 

It’s better to post a few intentional and strategic posts per week that craftily capture your intent in an eye-catching, value-providing way, than to flood your social channels with daily posts about the weather. Something is not always better than nothing in the world of social marketing. (Or any marketing for that matter.)

 

Here’s what it boils down to…

Allow me to insert myself as the theoretical customer. When I go looking for information about a business or their product/service, the first two places I’m going to look for it is their website and their social channels. 

While I expect the company’s website to have the most comprehensive information, I don’t always assume it will have the most current information. When I am looking for time-sensitive, up-to-date, accurate information about a business, I will almost always go to their social channels first for two reasons:

 

Firstly…

Businesses and individuals update their social channels way more frequently and are way more likely to post pertinent info to their feed than they are to call their web designer for a site update. (COVID is another great example, I go to a business’s social to see if they are actually open and what capacity they are serving customers) 

The opportunity here is to know that customers are searching out your social profile for specific information, so provide it for them. And make it easy to find. 

 

Secondly…

Social channels are all laid out the same way for every business, so it’s easy to get to a Facebook page, for instance, and know exactly where to find the company’s contact info, or know exactly where the photos of their menu would be located.

This makes social channels a valuable outlet for reaching the customers that are looking for you right now. Sometimes I get lost on a website while looking for something specific, so when I’m fairly sure that information would be on their social–I go there first because I believe I’ll find it faster since I already know the layout.  

 

⇩ 

 

This is all to illustrate the importance of an intentionally curated social media presence. It’s important to have so that your customers:

 

  • Can find you…where they want to find you. Meet your customers where they’re at. Almost ALL consumers are on social. (Facebook and Instagram, specifically.)

  • Can connect with you and your company’s values.

  • Can communicate with you about your product/service. (For instance, auto-messaging can be set up to greet customers when they land on your Facebook page.)

  • Can follow you and receive updates about your offerings when you post them.

 

For a small business, a quality social media presence is less about the number of likes and follows, and more about the story told throughout your posts.

Craft a story that will engage your audience in a way that provides emotional value to them, while also taking the opportunity to educate them about your company’s mission and how your products/services will improve the life of your customer.

 

I can help you craft your story.

Lindsi Kay Logo 3

Reach out to me.

lindsi.kay@hotmail.com